Statement by Thomas McIntosh (9/17/1792)

THOMAS McINTOSH being called on for his Defence, deli­vered a Paper Writing to the Court containing his Defence which was read by the Judge Advocate and is hereto annexed.

On the Morning of the 28th. of April, 1789, I was in my hammock and asleep when Mr. Cole Came and waked me and at the Same time Call'd Morrison, Simpson and Millward as we all slept in one tier. He told us that the people taken the Ship. I imediately got up and was putting on my Cloaths when Mr. Purcill Call'd me. I went up to him and ask'd what was to be done; he told me to go and get the Large Cutter's Knees, upon Which I went in quest of Norman and found him in the Cutter alongside and ask'd him where the Knees were; he told me they were in his Tool Chest. I went and got them and fitted the Boat and she was hoisted out. Mr. Purcill then Order'd me to get the Launche's Knees out of the Store Room. I went and was getting them when Norman Came to Assist Me; we got them up and fitted Her, and she was hoisted out, when Mr. Purcill Order'd me and Norman to get a Buckit of Nails some small Stores and two Saws (a Whip and Cross Cut); these we brought up and went for more articles which I thought might be of Service in the Boat; these I also brought and put into her. I then went down for my Own things and was returning with them, When I heard Mr. Christian Call to Churchill to prevent me from going into the Boat, as also Norman and Coleman; I did not know what to do, for I saw Coleman put his bag into the boat but was ordered to take it out again. I stood by the Gangway alongside of Norman Un till the Captain was Ordered into the Boat, When we both told him that Christian would not suffer us to go with him upon which he told us he would do us Justice, and I can Solemnly say before God and this Honorable Court that I had no hand in the unhappy Affair, but meant to go in the Boat with the Captain which he was fully satisfied of. I would not willingly trespass on the time of this Honor­able Court and have only to say that I did voluntarily submit to Lieut. Thos. Hayward and that I came to him for that purpose, and being fully satisfied with the Justice and Integrity of this Honorable Court I humbly wait their Awful Sentance.


[The prisoner then put the following document in as evidence. ]

"Mrs. Tosh.

Your son who went by the Name of McIntosh is on board the Bounty in the South Sea-1 was informed he remained on board contrary to his inclination, and therefore have recommended him to Mercy in case they should be taken.­-You may not expect to hear any thing of him until the Pandora returns, which will be 18 Months or two Years.

I am Your very Hmble. Servt.
Oct. 16th. 1790."

Mr. PURCELL called in again.

Q. Don't you remember when you was standing betwixt the Windlass and the Fore Hatchway that you called me, to which I answered and came up, and asked what was to be done?
A. I called him to go and assist to get the Boat's Geer up, which he did and gave me Assistance in getting the Boat ready; I can't be positive to my situation at the Time. 

Q. Do you remember, when there was a Debate about the Tool Chest going into the Boat, that the Captain said to Mr. Christian, "you let us have that Tool Chest, you have got a very good one in the Ship, and you may keep the Carpenter's two Mates? "
A. No. 

Q. Do you recollect Christian's giving orders to Churchill, to Mind that I nor Norman nor Coleman did not go into the Boat?
A. I recollect his giving a general Order of that kind, but to no singular Person.
Q. Be so good as to speak to my Character.
A. He was ever sober, diligent and attentive.

By the COURT
Q. You say you had heard a general Order given to prevent some of the People from going into the Boat; was McIntosh of that Number?
A. Yes.
Q. Did you hear any other Person's Name mentioned at that Time but those three?
A. I did not. 

The Witness withdrew.